Meet the finalists

OFFICE
All Finalists2020 Winners

Emily Hoggins MCIOB

BAM Construction

Emily Hoggins overcame the formidable difficulty of this three-storey office block with determination and inspiring leadership. With three Grade II-listed rail tunnels running a metre below the strip foundations for the super-lightweight bespoke-concrete build, the potential for project catastrophe was only too apparent. In her first role as project manager, she delivered on programme and within budget, and was commended by both client and architect.

About the Project

22 Handyside Street, King’s Cross

Construction of 36,000sqft mixed-use office block, completed in 85 weeks.

Client: Argent

Contract: JCT, design and build

Value: £19m

On this King’s Cross regeneration scheme, Emily Hoggins found herself running one of the highest-risk jobs in the UK at the time while at the same time being the project manager for the first time in her career. With three rail tunnels – all of them Grade II-listed Victorian-built structures, two of which were live – running just a metre below the strip foundations for the light-steel-frame three-storey block, the potential for project catastrophe was only too apparent.

The foundations had to be dug in no more than seven-metre strips at a time, with each strip filled by a concrete pour to reapply the load before the next strip could commence. As might be expected, a tunnel-monitoring system was deployed. Emily also oversaw the complex production and installation of a bespoke super-lightweight concrete for the pours.

Extinction Rebellion protests taking place in London at the time caused huge delays in concrete delivery, rendering it unusable on the project by the time it arrived. Emily was instrumental in inspiring the site teams to a gargantuan effort to complete the groundworks and the steel frame in time for the curtain walling to commence.

The superstructure was of an equally fiendish difficulty. Diagonally arranged to balance the weight better, the build replicates the line of the tunnels, as do the series of parallel standing-seam roofs. Emily introduced BIM to model each coping to ensure it matched the extremely difficult twists and 45-degree pitches involved.

Delivered on programme and within budget, she was commended by both client and architect. On such a technically challenging build, that is some achievement.